Book Review: The Secret Life of Winnie Cox by Sharon Maas

It is 1910, South America. Winnie Cox is living a privileged life as the daughter of sugarcane plantation owner.

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Winnie and her sister want for nothing. Everything they want is there for them. Servants at their beck and call, they don’t even realise the inequalities that exist around them. She gets small glimpses of a life very different to theirs however things come to a head when she meets George, a young man who does not fit the bill by any standards for someone like Winnie. George is a post office boy, a ‘darkie’. Winnie face to face with a reality that until then had been unknown to her. Not just that, she discovers the truth about people close to her. The people she had considered blameless had a side completely unknown to her.

The story follows the Winnie’s story at a time and place where racial prejudice and social inequality reigned. When falling in love with someone inappropriate would mean the end of you. The tale of two people bound by love, separated by society. How far is Winnie willing to go?

The story is not just about Winnie, it is about that time in history when things where literally ‘black and white’, when breaking social boundaries meant ostracism and heart break.

A beautifully written book, one which transports you to the place it is set in – which I absolutely love, as most of you who read me must know. As with all of Sharon Maas’ books, they evoke such strong imagery of the settings. I’ve learnt so much of British Guyana since I’ve started reading her. It captivated me so much that I’ve even gone and read up about it. I love it when books do that to you, when the place the story is set in, is more than just a setting, it’s so vibrantly described that it is a character in its own right.

My Rating: A 4.5/5 read for me. The story, the plot, the twist, the setting, everything was perfect. I can’t wait to pick up the next Sharon Maas book.

About the Author
Sharon Maas was born in Georgetown, Guyana in 1951, and spent many childhood hours either curled up behind a novel or writing her own adventure stories. Sometimes she had adventures of her own, and found fifteen minutes of Guyanese fame for salvaging an old horse-drawn coach from a funeral parlor, fixing it up, painting it bright blue, and tearing around Georgetown with all her teenage friends. The coach ended up in a ditch, but thankfully neither teens nor horse were injured. Boarding school in England tamed her somewhat; but after a few years as a reporter with the Guyana Graphic in Georgetown she plunged off to discover South America by the seat of her pants.

A powerful story balancing the different points of views, the circumstances that existed and the struggles, both Winnie and George’s and the communities that
bore the brunt of the racial and social discrimination.

Her first novel, Of Marriageable Age, was published in 1999 by HarperCollins, and is set in India, Guyana and England. Two further novels, Peacocks Dancing and The Speech of Angels, followed.

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5 thoughts on “Book Review: The Secret Life of Winnie Cox by Sharon Maas

  1. This one sounds like something I’d love to read. What do you think? Will I like it?

    More than the storyline of the book, I loved the author bio. She sounds so very interesting! Of course, she has interesting stories to tell!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Book  Review: The Sugar Planter’s Daughter by Sharon Maas | Any Excuse To Read

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