Night Road by Kristin Hannah

A book that was recommended by Goodreads. An author I had never heard of, but I guess, now on, I will be keeping an eye out for her books.


For Jude Farraday, a mother of twins, the last eighteen years of her life had been around her children. Mia and Zach, the twins were different personalities. Zach was the super confident boy with all the girls fawning over him. Mia was a shy teenager, who some girls made friends with just to be able to get close to Zach. They lived a seemingly perfect life, in a perfect community.

Lexi Baill, a former foster child moves into their community and ends up as Mia’s best friend. Jude takes Lexi under her wing and tries to make up for the unfortunate life that she had, in whatever little ways she could, without making Lexi feel like a charity case. For the first time in her life, Mia has a friend she can count on, someone who she trusts. Zach and Lexi end up falling in love, which initially upset Mia, but she manages to overcome it, and the three become close buddies.

It is senior year of high school, and the three of them, are in the process of applying for admissions into colleges. Jude starts to feel her control over the twins slipping, she starts to get worried about how close Zach and Lexi seem to be getting. The foreboding of danger that she had, turns into reality when one night, everything changes for the Faraday family and Lexi. A nightmare that they never would have imagined in their wildest dreams. One that shatters them and overnight, from a loving close-knit family, they become a shell of a family.

Jude is in put in a position of having to forgive someone who, in her mind, is the reason for her loss, her tragedy. Jude has to forgive, or live in bitterness. Her sadness and bitterness transforms her into someone totally different from what she had been. It was almost as if her capacity to love had been turned off. All the characters in the book are believable, real and people we start empathizing with.

A beautiful book, am absolute page turner. A book that explores the situation from all view points. From the teenagers(in different situations), from the mother’s when she is unable to let go, and when tragedy strikes. Of love that can be enduring, and lifelong. Of times when forgiving can get one the peace that one longs for. A book that pulls at your heart-strings, and makes you wish that you could just make it all perfect. The pain that the protagonists go through, and the hope that it ends with. An absolutely lovely book. A recommended read.

Vanishing Acts by Jodi Picoult

Just when I think, I’ve read all of her books, I come across one more that I haven’t! And there is nothing that beats that feeling! I just love her books.

Delia Hopkins is happy, living in rural New Hampshire, with her daughter and fiancee and her widowed father who brought her up all by himself. She works as a search and rescue professional, assisted by her bloodhound. She has all that she holds dear, close by her, her daughter, father Andrew, fiance, Eric and close friend, Fitz. Her happy, peaceful is suddenly shattered when police lands up at her door step. Turns out that she had been kidnapped – by her own father. Everything she believed in seems to be a farce.

All she could do was ask Eric to defend her father. As the story unfolds, it throws Delia into the deep end. Everything she believed in, is now questioned. The father who was a devoted father turns out to be a kidnapper who stole her away from her own mother. What went wrong? What made her father do this – Are questions that haunt Delia. To add to it all, the mother she believed was dead, was very much alive. The mother who had been separated from her daughter for 28 years. Now a mother herself, Delia is in a tough position, of trying to believe the best of her dad, while trying to realign herself to the new truths that she discovers.

Typical of Picoult’s writings, the book handles situations that are emotionally tough, and makes the reader wonder how they would have handled such a situation. A tale of human weaknesses and reactions and relationships. Picoult spins tales that question boundaries. How far can a parent go to protect their child? Can anything justify the step, Andrew took. The characters are well formed, and the story grips you. A typical Jodi Picoult. I would definitely recommend it to Picoult fans.

About the Author
Picoult was born and raised in Nesconset on Long Island, New York. Her first story, at age 5 was “The Lobster Which Misunderstood.” She studied writing at Princeton University, graduating in 1987, and had two short stories published by Seventeen magazine while still in college. She is the best selling author with several best-sellers to her credit.

Friendships beyond boundaries..

My three year old daughter started nursery in a school last week. Yesterday, she talked about ‘her friends’.

So I asked her who her friends were. She replied, ‘my friends’. So I asked their name, and she replied, ‘I dunno’. So I asked, ‘What do you call her’ and she replied, ‘My friends’.

I gave up. I was talking to her key worker this morning and she said that daughter had indeed made some friends. So I mentioned the conversation above and she reassured me that it is completely normal. Children connect with other children, without even needing parameters such as names.

I have always noticed how Poohi does not notice race, or colour , in others. And we never mention it either. Children adapt so well to people, based on how different people behave with them. They know, instinctively, who can be approached and who cannot. This nursery, employs the same concept. They just let the children mingle and decide for themselves, who they are comfortable with. I was talking to another mum, while waiting to pick up daughter on the way back, and she was mentioning how she was not happy with this approach. I had found it nice, that they let the children decide for themselves, while she felt that a child would have felt more comfortable if they are introduced to each other formally and told a bit about themselves.. And I don’t know which approach is better, to be honest. I guess it totally depends on the child and what makes him/her comfortable. Some may be comfortable with a little more adult guidance, while others might be very independent.  Especially children for whom, this is the first time away from their parents, a bit more adult guidance might be comforting.. for others like my daughter – it might not make a difference either way.

This reminded me of something that I read a couple of days back.

Babies come to us unconditioned spirits. We condition them to our reality, but who is wiser to the TRUTH.

I have been reading a lot of books, I had never heard about, thanks to my library where I can never spot any of the best sellers. The only redeeming thing is that I get to take 20 books, so I pile on, every book I can lay my hands on.  I also end up picking up a lot of Indian (or Indian origin) writing. This book was one of the good ones.  Hindi-Bindi Club by Monika Pradhan.

It was the story of two generations.Three mothers who are first generation immigrants to America and their three daughters. It was interesting to see how dynamics shifted throughout the story. One of the mothers said this in the book and it touched a chord for me. And I guess, I found it more interesting because of the part about cultures clashing and it also gave me a perspective of how my life would be , if I chose to stay here.

I am in the phase, where I want to write(hence the post), even when I have no time, so please forgive me for these ramblings and for not blog hopping, and not replying to comments.. Will get to it.